12/05/2012 by Carney Sandoe Staff |

Personal Statement Guidelines

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The personal statement is the document we get the most questions about. What exactly is it? What should I write? Why do I need it?

We keep our guidelines intentionally broad because just as every person is unique, so is every personal statement.

What is a personal statement?

A personal statement is a reflection of you. It is an outlet through which you can convey your educational philosophy, your pedagogical beliefs, and your ideas and goals about teaching and/or administration. It is a way for your voice to ring through your file and be heard by potential hiring contacts at schools.

What should I include in my personal statement?

Anything that's important to you! You can include anecdotal information that will make your candidacy more interesting, outline your professional accomplishments and address how your experiences have prepared you for the move you are making, or recount an instance in your past when you were inspired by a former teacher or colleague (specific examples or stories are always great!). You could discuss a few of your personality traits, particularly those that help explain why you work well with children or why you would succeed in a school setting. You could blend any number of these themes or create something totally new.

How long should it be?

Keep it concise. The statement should be one to two pages long, tops.

Is a personal statement required in order to complete my CS&A file?

While we have from time to time referred candidates who have not submitted a personal statement, we recommend writing one, if for no other reason than that most of our candidate files have them and the schools we work with look for them when you send your file.

Anything else to know?

Please don't forget to put your name atop your statement. While it will be bundled with your file and all its associated materials (transcripts, resume, etc.), if a school does decide to print it out or email it to a colleague helping with hiring, you want to be sure they know who it's from.

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